Book Review: “Jane the Quene” by Janet Wertman

513yHRNsuFLHenry VIII may have had six wives, but only one could give him the desired son that he wanted. She was kind, demure and everything that Henry VIII’s second wife Anne Boleyn was not. Her name was Jane Seymour, Henry’s third wife. Sadly, she is often remembered for the birth of her son and her death. However, there was a lot more to Jane’s story than the ending. What was her relationship with her family like? How did she fall in love with the King? And how was her relationship with her romantic rival, Anne Boleyn? These are just some of the questions that Janet Wertman strives to answer in her first novel of her new Seymour Saga called, “Jane the Quene”.

I would like to thank Janet Wertman for sending me a copy of “Jane the Quene”. This was a delightful read and a fantastic start to the Seymour Saga.

Wertman begins her book with a prologue of Jane Seymour entering the services of Henry’s first wife Catherine of Aragon. In this opening scene, we begin to see a rivalry bloom between Jane and her cousins Anne and Mary Boleyn. After Catherine and Henry divorce, Anne Boleyn becomes Queen and Jane Seymour is in the services of the new queen, hoping to help and serve while looking for a husband. Her brother Edward does not think that having Jane in court is really working to help her find a husband. He wants to send her home so that her younger sister can possibly find a husband, but things change when King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn visit Wolf Hall. Wertman description of how the king and Jane become friends during this visit is rather charming and very natural. Jane tries to ignore the king’s interest in her, but Henry can’t forget the kind and demure nature of Jane and eventually, the two fall in love, even though Henry is still married to Anne.

In the middle of this tangled love mess is Thomas Cromwell, a clerk who wants to please his king in order to make his own career grow. Henry is not happy with his marriage to Anne Boleyn since she has not been able to give him  a son, so he gives Cromwell the task of “getting rid of her”. However, Cromwell needs to find another wife who would be the opposite of Anne Boleyn. That is when he comes up with a plan to make Jane Seymour Henry’s next wife and queen, which does succeed.  

Wertman’s Jane Seymour is a complex character who cares about her family and her husband. She is not just some plain wallflower who merely followed Anne Boleyn as Henry’s wife for a short time. With strong allies, like Cromwell and her brothers Edward and Thomas, Jane rises like a phoenix and survives all of the hate from Anne to become Henry’s beloved wife and queen. Wertman portrays Henry VIII as a man who is intelligent, caring and who struggles with how to reform the church.

Wertman breathes new life into the story of Jane Seymour. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this novel, which is the first book in her Seymour Saga, as it balances the political intrigue of the Tudor court with the romance between Henry and Jane. Their love story is one that is often forgotten in the chaos of Henry’s marriage track record, but one that needs to be told. Jane will not be just the “third wife” or “the mother of Edward VI” after this book. She was a strong woman who truly loved Henry VIII.  If you really want to read a novel about Jane Seymour, I highly recommend you read “Jane the Quene” by Janet Wertman.

Book Review: “The Path to Somerset” by Janet Wertman

Path-to-Somerset-eBook-Cover-ProofEdward Seymour, the brother of Thomas and Jane Seymour, as well as the uncle of Edward VI. Many people remember him for his role as Lord Protector to his nephew as well as his role in the execution of his brother Thomas. That, however, is only a small snapshot into the life of an interesting man. His life  after his sister Jane died and before he became the 1st Duke of Somerset was one of twists and turns. Nothing was safe for the brother of Henry VIII’s most beloved wife, especially when it came to dealing with his enemy at court, Bishop Stephen Gardiner. This is the time period that Janet Wertman has decided to explore in her latest book, “The Path to Somerset”, the second book in her Seymour saga (The first book of the Seymour saga is called “Jane the Quene”).

I would like to thank Janet Wertman for sending me an advance review copy of “The Path to Somerset”. This is my first time reading a Janet Wertman book and I must say that it was a joy to read. I am familiar with some aspects of the Seymour family, like Jane and Thomas, but Edward Seymour is one of those people who I have wanted to read more about for quite a while. From the books that I have read, Edward seemed like a cruel person when it came to his brother. That is not how he is portrayed in this book. In fact, Edward Seymour is a loving and caring husband who only wants to do what he believes is best for his King, Henry VIII. He tries to navigate the ever changing political scene, the religious dilemma, as well as Henry’s three wives, all while trying to stay alive.

His family and friends were always there to support him, especially his beloved wife Anne Stanhope and his brother Thomas, or “Tom” in this book. Anne has always been one of those women from this period that I never really liked, but in this book, she is very likable. Henry VIII himself is a sick man, full of pain and regrets of his past. He is a loving family man who misses Jane terribly and tries to fill the void in his heart while trying to keep control of his country. Bishop Stephen Gardiner tries to pursue a way to get on the King’s good side using some very underhanded methods.

Janet Wertman is able to bring to life this tumultuous rivalry between Gardiner and Seymour in such a way that you can understand both sides. Two men fighting for the control of  King Henry VIII, and later King Edward VI, but only one man can come out on top. This book was a fantastic read. It was very engaging and intriguing. It gave me a different perspective on Edward Seymour and the people who surrounded him during this time. Janet Wertman does a fantastic job navigating this complex political landscape to show Edward Seymour in a new light. This may be my first time reading a book by Janet Wertman, but this will not be my last. I thoroughly enjoyed her writing style and I look forward to reading more books by her. I would highly recommend this book for anyone who is interested in the Seymour family or the last years of Henry VIII’s life.

If you are interested in this book and want to learn more on how you can get a copy for yourself, you can pre-order a copy of it here.

“The Path of Somerset” by Janet Wertman will be released in August 2018.