Book Review: “Timeless Falcon- Volume One” by Phillipa Vincent- Connolly

53298476._SY475_Have you ever wondered what it would be like to travel into the past? You could interact with your favorite historical figures and truly understand what they were like. You could dine like a king or a commoner, dress to impress and experience everyday life. There would be risks involved, but any history nerd might jump at the chance to explore the past. One lucky history student named Beth Wickers discovers that a ring in her professor’s office allows her to travel back into the past to visit her favorite historical icon, Anne Boleyn. Can Beth help Anne to survive the dangerous Tudor court of Henry VIII? Follow Beth’s adventures in Tudor England in Phillipa Vincent-Connolly’s first historical fiction novel, “Timeless Falcon- Volume One”.

I would like to thank Phillipa Vincent-Connolly for sending me a copy of this book. I was a bit skeptical at first about a historical fiction novel that involved time travel, but it did sound intriguing so I decided to give it a try.

We are first introduced to Beth Wickers as she is experiencing a typical day at her university, studying and attending lectures by Professor Marshall. She finds herself going into Professor Marshall’s office where she finds an extraordinary ring that allows Beth to go back in time, to 1522. There, she finds herself in the colorful home of the Boleyn family, Hever Castle. It all seems like a fanciful dream, that is until Beth encounters the legend herself, Anne Boleyn.

While their first encounter is indeed memorable, I do have some concerns with it, especially when it comes to the time travel idea. My main concerns are that Beth mentions to Anne that she is from the future and she allows Anne to handle objects from the twenty-first century. This is probably me just being nit-picky, but as someone who is a fan of the idea of time travel, I do have issues when a character from one time period flat out says that they are from the future to someone from the past, not to mention allowing them to interact with objects from the future. My understanding is that with time travel, those from the future should be inconspicuous, but in this case, it does work.

Besides the logistics of time travel, I found this story rather enjoyable. It is a charming tale of when a 21st-century girl is thrown into the Tudor era. Her interactions with the past and how she copes with it all is thrilling as you wonder if she will ever get back to her own time and if she can help those who she holds dear. I love how Connolly creates two believable worlds and a protagonist who is so relatable. Beth’s interactions with her family and friends in her time paralleled the interactions with the Boleyn family. I loved how the Boleyns seemed like another family for Beth; Thomas Boleyn welcoming Beth into his home, kind Lady Boleyn, her complex relationship with the ever-charming George Boleyn, and her friendship with Anne that truly lasts centuries. We also see Beth interacting with other famous figures like Jane Parker, Mary Boleyn, Thomas Wolsey, Katherine of Aragon, and the big man himself, King Henry VIII.

I was not sure about this novel when I first read the description because of the time travel element, however, I think it was a delightful read. I think Beth was such a relatable heroine for so many fellow history nerds who would just want to protect their favorite historical figure from any harm. This book will make you question whether you would make the same decisions that Beth does and whether you can protect the integrity of the past. If you want a historical fiction novel about the Tudors that is fun and unlike any novel you have read before, check out, “Timeless Falcon- Volume One” by Phillipa Vincent-Connolly. I am looking forward to the next volume to see how far Beth will travel into the past.

Book Review: “The Anne Boleyn Collection II” by Claire Ridgway

18588008The Boleyn family have been viewed as social climbers, who only desired power and prestige, in history and novels for centuries; their fall from grace was due to their ambitions. But, is this true? Did Anne Boleyn’s family only care about getting to the top by any means necessary? Were they manipulative, cunning, and cruel like they have been portrayed in dramas and novels? Who were the Boleyns and why have they been so maligned in history? In her second book of this series, “The Anne Boleyn Collection II”, Claire Ridgway of The Anne Boleyn Files examines Anne Boleyn and the truth about her family.

After I had finished the first edition of “The Anne Boleyn Collection”, I did have a conversation with Claire Ridgway about the structure of her book. If you read my review about that particular book, I did have a slight issue with the blog article structure of the book. Claire Ridgway explained that it was intentional as these books are a collection of blog articles from The Anne Boleyn Files, which helped me while reading the second collection of articles.

In my opinion, Ridgway’s structure in this second collection is much better than the first collection. It reads like a book and it is in an order that makes sense. We start our journey with the origins of the Boleyn family, which was fascinating and very informative to read about the different theories of how this family rose to power. Then, it is all about Anne and her life and the myths around her. Compared to her previous book, I found this part well researched and I learned a lot. Anne Boleyn is not exactly my favorite wife of King Henry VIII, but I did feel sympathy for her, and I could see why so many people do defend her while reading about her in this book.

The last section of this book deals with Anne Boleyn’s immediate family. Her father Thomas Boleyn has been viewed as a “power-hungry pimp” who only cared about his position rather than his children, but Ridgway shows that this was not the case. Anne’s mother Elizabeth Boleyn has been a shadowy figure in the past, yet Ridgway dives to find out what kind of parent she was and the rumors around her. Was George Boleyn such a scandalous figure and what was his relationship with his wife Jane Boleyn like? What is the truth about Mary Boleyn’s story? And finally, Ridgway explores the big question about the Boleyns and their religious viewpoints.

This is my favorite book from The Anne Boleyn Collection series so far. Claire Ridgway’s research and writing style has improved significantly between the two books, and it shows. I did thoroughly enjoy this one and I wanted to do my own research into these topics after reading this book. I learned so much about the Boleyns that it made me realize that maybe they were not as bad as novels and dramas have portrayed them. If you think you know the Boleyns, I would suggest you read, “The Anne Boleyn Collection II” by Claire Ridgway. It may change your mind about how you view this hotly debated family of Anne Boleyn.

Book Review: “The Most Happy” by Holly-Eloise Walters

71957495_567591223787906_5646049859975774208_nThe story of Anne Boleyn is one of love, triumph, and tragedy. Her tale has been told in many different ways in the several centuries since her execution by many different people. Except by Anne Boleyn herself. We never truly understood what it might have felt like when she went to court for the first time, what it must have felt like to have fallen in love with King Henry VIII. How she might have felt when she had her daughter and experienced her numerous miscarriages. The devastation she must have felt when she found out about Henry’s abusive side, his mistresses, and her ultimate demise. That is until now.  In Holly-Eloise Walters’ debut novel, “The Most Happy”, Anne Boleyn tells her personal story, giving the readers a better understanding of the legend.

I would like to thank Holly- Eloise Walters for sending me a copy of her book to read and review. It can be nerve-wracking when you give someone your debut book to read and I am glad I got a chance to read it.

Normally with historical novels, we are introduced to the protagonist by being in their childhood home. That is not the direction that Walters takes as we are introduced to Anne Boleyn as she is in her lowest point, in the Tower waiting to be executed. She is alone, wishing that she could be saved, but knowing that she was going to die. Anne is firm in her love for Henry, even after all they have been through, but her one desire is to see her daughter Elizabeth “Lizzie” in this novel, again. It is in her darkest hour that she chooses to reflect on her life, which is the bulk of this book. 

What Walters does extremely well is focused on the relationships that were central in Anne’s life. Obviously, the biggest relationship was the relationship between Anne and her husband King Henry VIII. To say that their relationship was complicated would be an understatement. They started off falling madly in love with one another, not caring who they hurt as long as they were together, but then it dissolved into a rather abusive relationship. Walters also touches on the relationships between Anne and her family. While I agree with how Anne’s relationships with her siblings George and Mary, I do not necessarily agree with how Walters portrays Anne’s relationship with her parents, but that is just a personal comment. This portrayal of Anne’s life is very raw and real, focusing on emotions and relationships.

The one real concern that I had when I was reading this particular novel was the lack of details about the locations and physical descriptions of the people, which can be a difficult thing to do. It was a tad difficult to visualize the people and the locations, but I believe that as Walters grows as an author, she will get better with her descriptions. 

Overall, I think this was a very good debut novel. Walters obviously cares about telling Anne’s story through her eyes. It is a bit raw and rough around the edges, but where it shines is the portrayal of the relationships between Anne and those who were around her and were important in her life. You really feel sympathy for Anne Boleyn and heartache for her through Walters’ easy to follow writing style. This may be Walters’ first novel, but I do see potential in her writing. If you would like a new novel about Anne Boleyn from her perspective, I would recommend you read, “The Most Happy” by Holly-Eloise Walters.

Book Review: “Among the Wolves of Court: The Untold Story of Thomas and George Boleyn” by Lauren Mackay

71viExOsCxLThe age of the Tudors has fascinated historians for centuries. As of recently, there has been a shift in how we view historical figures. Historians have been stripping away the more controversial elements that have been ingrained in how we view historical figures to look for the truth. Historical figures like Anne and Mary Boleyn have been placed under the microscope and have been given a closer look in recent years. But what about the men of Boleyn family, Thomas, and George? What were their lives really like? Did they truly desire power and titles so much that they were willing to do anything to get it? Those are the questions that Lauren Mackay decided to explore in her latest book, “Among the Wolves of Court: The Untold Story of Thomas and George Boleyn.”

Mackay explains her goal for writing this book about Thomas and George Boleyn:

This book attempts to dispel the traditional stereotypes, relying on the textual traces of both Boleyn men, which are dispersed in a wide variety of sources across English and European archives and libraries. I want to present a more complete account of these men- their political and personal trajectories, the evolution of their careers, and what mattered to them. Where judgment can be made it has been done so cautiously. In the absence of any extensive scholarly consideration, they have remained captive to a dated historiography which is a reflection of the frame within which the world continues to view them, and from which this book seeks to unburden them. While this is a biography of two generations of Boleyns, I should note that there is far more evidence on Thomas than George, whose career had barely taken off before he was executed, therefore a great deal of the book naturally follows Thomas’ lengthy career with George brought in as the evidence allows. (Mackay, 5).

In order to understand the Boleyns, Mackay begins her book with a brief history of the Boleyn family and how they were able to come into the service of the English monarchy. It is interesting to read how the Boleyns came from such humble beginnings and their loyalty to the Tudors and the Lancastrians during the Wars of the Roses. While brief, this part of this book is imperative to understand how loyal and hardworking the Boleyn men were, especially the father Thomas Boleyn.

Both Thomas and George were diplomats and were part of embassies and special envoys in order to establish good relationships with other countries through discussions and treaties. Mackay takes time to explain these political terms for those readers who do not understand how 16th-century politics work. As someone who wanted to know more about the political system of the 16th century, this helped me quite a bit. Thomas earned respect and many of his titles through his own merits, although there are some who believe that he gained some of his titles through his daughters’ affairs with King Henry VIII. We see the rise of the Boleyns as well as the inevitable fall of Anne and George that lead to their executions.

Lauren Mackay gives us a more realistic perspective of Thomas and George Boleyn. They were not men who would do anything for power. Thomas was a man loyal to the crown and his family while George was a young and naive man who was trying to follow in the footsteps of his father. Thomas and George had their names dragged through the mud by people who did not like them. Mackay’s book breathes new life to the legacy of the Boleyns. “Among the Wolves of Court: The Untold Story of Thomas and George Boleyn” by Lauren Mackay is a perfect introduction for anyone who is interested in the inner workings of the English court during the early years of Henry VIII’s reign and a fascinating look into the Boleyns and their legacy.